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SEX HEALTH: The top 3 most embarrassing gay men’s health problems, sorted!

Dr Elizabeth Kershaw-Yate and The Online Clinic are here to help Out News Global’s readers face up to their most embarrassing health issues.

Let’s face it, sometimes the health problems we think are the most embarrassing are actually really common. Let’s start with one we can pretty much all see…unless a wig get’s involved.

1. Hair Loss

Well he doesn’t look too bothered by his hair but some guys lose it when they lose it.

 

Dr Liz says: Hair loss can be very stressful to experience. However, most of the time, it is completely normal.

 

We say: Gay guys can be pretty self-conscious about their hair but most don’t see baldness as a bad thing in sexual partners. It’s more about a cute smile and…a fit body goes a long way. Only thing is…do all bald gay guys have to be bears?

 

Dr Liz advises: Every day we lose up to 150 hairs on average. The entire shedding cycle consists of hairs being continually lost and replaced, and it can take up to five years to go through the entire cycle.

 

However, sometimes the hairs don’t grow back. Hair loss is very common – with around

25% of males beginning to lose their hair before the age of 30. Despite being a common

condition, losing hair can be a very embarrassing experience.

 

So what actually causes hair loss?

 

A combination of hormones, genetics and age.

Stress – which can cause hair to fall out in patches. This is known as Alopecia Areata.

Excessive braiding and strain on the hair follicles.

An autoimmune disorder which stops hair from growing.

 

We say: As long as your hairloss isn’t a sign of something else going on, don’t stress about it! Bald guys can still be super handsome and having hair does not necessarily mean you’re sexy. I mean…look at this Pinterest site:

 

 

That jumper looks itchy…take it off

 

2. Erectile dysfunction

It’s hard when it isn’t…

 

Dr Liz says: Erectile dysfunction can be extremely embarrassing but it’s important to know the causes.

 

We say: The pressure to be rock hard when you need to be can be pretty overwhelming and actually make the problem much bigger…and your dick much smaller. However, it’s still a majorly common condition.

 

Dr Liz advises: Occasional erectile dysfunction is common when combined with alcohol, drugs or

performance anxiety, but sometimes these issues are a bit more long-term.

 

Around 5% of men aged 40 will experience long-term erectile dysfunction but this

percentage increases with age.

 

It happened if you looked at a banana when you were 13, now what happened?

So what causes erectile dysfunction?

Three key things are needed to have an erection, and if one of them fails, it can result in

erectile dysfunction:

 

The nerves attached to the penis must be intact and working

There has to be enough blood circulation

There must be sexual stimulation signals from the brain

 

Erectile dysfunction can also be a sign of a more serious health problem such as diabetes,

vascular disease or kidney disease. If you’re worried about the cause of your erectile

dysfunction, it’s best to see a GP to discuss causes and treatments such as medication and

counselling.

 

3. STIs

This is not an STI, it is a man with a spoon on his nose

 

Dr Liz says: Despite medical advancements and research, the use of condoms has declined in recent

years. Unfortunately, this means that STIs have become increasingly common.

We say: If you get the itch to have random sex, you’re likely to get an itch and much more afterwards. Just get it sorted okay?

 

Dr Liz advises: There is no real way to completely avoid STIs except abstinence – but you can dramatically

reduce your chances of catching a disease by using a barrier method of contraception such

as condoms.

Do not ask random Google chat boards for advice!

Make sure you visit a GP if you find yourself experiencing:

Any discharge

Testicular pain

Painful rashes and lesions on the genitals.

 

Anything appearing within 2 weeks of unprotected sex on the genital area should be

presumed to be an STI until proven otherwise.

 

With all of these issues – if you are in any doubt, it’s best to visit a GP and get checked out!

 

Advice given by Dr Elizabeth Kershaw-Yates, GP and one of the medical team at

TheOnlineClinic: https://www.theonlineclinic.co.uk

 

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