Barratt Developments, together with research partner GoodMore Global, has recently investigated the changing buying behaviours in London and the South East following the initial UK-lockdown period. The research has found that in West Sussex 30% of buyers have looked online for a new home since the initial lockdown, with the figure sitting at 33% of buyers in East Sussex.

What’s more, the research overall has revealed that 18-34 year old’s are twice as likely to want to move than those aged 50+, with almost half reporting that they have visited and viewed a property in the last month.

In a cultural shift, younger people – those under 34 – are now more likely to move further away from their place of work to find the right property, with 47% saying they’ll move more than half an hour away for the perfect home. As the research also reveals that it is this younger age group who are expecting to be able to work from home more in the coming months, the trend is easily explained – as 41% of under 34s expect they will be working from home at least 3 days a week. 

Lynnette St-Quintin, Sales and Marketing Director for Barratt Southern Counties, comments: “As we were all restricted to our own four walls from March as the pandemic took hold, 2020 has given us all a period of reflection, and where we live is just one of these strands of thought. In many typical scenarios, we live near work or near transport that allows us to get into work quicker, therefore living in denser areas to have access to these conveniences. But what lockdown has shown is that for those who can, we are able to work more remotely in part and in the long-term it is likely that this will remain the case.”

Natalie Perry, Sales and Marketing Director for David Wilson Homes, adds: “This realisation, combined with financial incentives like stamp duty savings, will explain why new homes sales in the counties that surround London have seen a surge of sales in recent months. 

“It is therefore unsurprising that those most likely under 40 who are buying their first home, or renting, are moving further out to access more space for their money. It is certainly something we are seeing in our regional sales divisions when we speak to our customers.”

Barratt and David Wilson Homes, part of Barratt Developments, recently launched its Meadowburne Place development in Eastbourne, East Sussex. The first phase will comprise of two, three and four-bedroom homes set on the edge of the South Downs. Ideal for families, there are a number of primary schools nearby, whilst the seaside hotspot of Eastbourne is just four miles away. Prices start from £254,995.

Also in East Sussex, Barratt has a number of three and four-bedroom homes available at its Chalkers Rise development in Peacehaven. The new homes are situated next to Centenary Park, with playgrounds, five football pitches and a café, whilst the South Downs are just moments away. Barratt is offering residents a free bus pass for all residents, and free car club membership for a year. Prices start from £314,995.

David Wilson Homes has recently released its third phase of new homes at Rosewood Park in Bexhill, offering three and four-bedroom homes. Situated in a parkland setting in a tree lined boulevard, the development features open spaces and ecology areas. Prices start from £314,995.

In West Sussex, Barratt’s popular Wychwood Park development offers a collection of three, four and five-bedroom homes. The development boasts plenty of open space, with 3.7 acres of ancient woodland forming part of the site. There are a number of good schools nearby, whilst the train station is just a couple of miles away, connecting residents with ease to London and Brighton. Prices start from £379,995.

To find out more about Meadowburne Place, Chalkers Rise or Wychwood Park, call 0333 355 8498 or visit www.barratthomes.co.uk. For further details on Meadowburne Place or Rosewood Park, call 0333 355 8503 or visit www.dwh.co.uk

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